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Yomarie “Jo” Habenicht is an associate in the Firm’s Tax Department, specializing in U.S. federal, corporate, partnership and international tax matters.

Jo focuses her practice on tax structuring and planning for a variety of transactions, including mergers and acquisitions, financings, cross-border transactions, restructurings, bankruptcy related transactions and joint ventures.

Her practice also includes providing day-to-day tax advice to domestic and foreign companies on a broad range of tax issues. Jo represents companies before the Internal Revenue Service and local tax authorities on tax examinations.

A co-chair of the Proskauer Women’s Alliance Steering Committee, Jo was selected to be a Protégée for Proskauer’s Women's Sponsorship Program, an initiative that champions high-performing mid-level and senior lawyers as emerging leaders.

Prior to joining Proskauer, Jo worked in the tax services department of a Big 4 accounting firm. She is fluent in Spanish.

On January 17, 2024, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Jason Smith (R-Mo.) released a bill, the “Tax Relief for American Families and Workers Act of 2024” (“TRAFA” or the “bill”). All of the provisions in the bill are taxpayer favorable, except

On December 27, 2022, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and the U.S. Department of the Treasury (the “Treasury”) released Notice 2023-2 (the “Notice”), which provides guidance regarding the application of the 1% excise tax on corporate stock buybacks under recently enacted section 4501 (the “Tax”).[1]  Taxpayers may rely on the Notice until proposed regulations are published.  The Notice also contains a request for comments on the rules included in the Notice and rules not included in the Notice.

The Treasury and the IRS took a literal interpretation of the statute; thus, the Tax applies broadly to stock repurchases and other transactions that are not traditionally viewed as stock buybacks, including a repurchase of mandatorily redeemable preferred stock (even if such stock was issued before January 1, 2023).  Special purpose acquisition companies (“SPACs”) will need to analyze whether a transaction is subject to the Tax under the general rules as the Notice does not include any special guidance for SPACs.  However, SPACs did receive comfort that redemptions that take place in the same year as a “complete liquidation” under section 331 are not subject to the Tax.

On January 18, 2019, the U.S. Department of Treasury (“Treasury”) and the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) released final regulations (the “Final Regulations”) regarding the “passthrough deduction” for qualified trade or business income under section 199A of the Internal Revenue Code.[1] The Final Regulations modify proposed regulations (the “Proposed Regulations”) that were released in August 2018. The Final Regulations apply to tax years ending after February 8, 2019, but taxpayers may rely on the Proposed Regulations for taxable years ending in calendar year 2018.

Section 199A was enacted in 2017 as part of the tax reform act.[2] Generally, section 199A provides a deduction (the “passthrough deduction”) of up to 20% for individuals and certain trusts and estates of certain of the income from certain trades or businesses that are operated as a sole proprietorship, or through certain passthrough entities. The passthrough deduction provides a maximum effective rate of 29.6%.

This post provides background and summarizes some of the most important changes from the Proposed Regulations to the Final Regulations. For more information, please contact any of the Proskauer tax lawyers listed on this post or your regular Proskauer contact.

On June 13, 2017, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and the Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”) re-released proposed regulations (REG 136118-15) that provide guidance on the new centralized partnership audit regime. The centralized partnership audit regime was enacted in November 2015 by Section 1101 of the Bipartisan